letterboxing

The Dos (and mostly don’ts) of Letterboxing in Colorado

Updated March 2020. Do you remember the Pokemon Go craze of last summer? (Really, who could forget it!) Here’s a way to get your kids exploring without technology.  I have always been intrigued by treasure hunts. The prospect of discovering something valuable and cosseted is exciting to me. From the moment I first watched The Amazing Race, I was hooked. Following clues and traveling the world would be a dream come true. Getting lost in umpteen countries is not. When my kids were younger, we watched a movie that got me excited about doing my own treasure hunt. One option was geocaching but it does not hold much allure for me. This can be attributed to the fact that I cannot operate a GPS. I had heard about letterboxing so figured it would be the next best thing. Not familiar...

Letterboxing: Finding More Than Just Hidden Treasure

What is Letterboxing? Amber wrote a post here, but I thought I’d add a little update of our own.  Honestly, before Amber’s post, I’d never heard of it. I thought maybe it was a craft idea or a new exercise routine. Well, it’s not! Oddly enough, being “crafty” helps, and you do get your exercise, but it’s more about finding hidden treasure…and more. With Letterboxing, you are given clues to a hidden box containing a carved stamp and logbook. (Some are so tiny that there’s only room for the carved stamp, so you just log those finds online. The site we use most often is AtlasQuest) You find this box and use the carving to put a stamp in your book. You then use your own personalized stamp to mark the logbook that was in the hidden box....