Denver Children’s Hospital

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Lots of mothers will tell you their lives changed forever the day their child was born. That was true for me, too, but then just nine days later, my life changed again. That was the day my daughter died. I didn’t expect to get pregnant. After years of being told my husband, Dan, and I could not conceive, we’d started our family a less traditional way, by foster-adopting a beautiful baby boy. Six months later, I discovered I was pregnant. On May 3, 2006, we welcomed Rhiannon Fay-Marie McMurray into the world. Doctors said our little girl was in picture-perfect health and sent us home. After a little more than a week, Rhiannon began acting fussy, stopped eating and wouldn’t sleep. Worried, I took her to the doctor’s office on May 11. There, between the waiting area and the examin...

The Children’s Hospital Q & A: Clean Clothes & Clear Skin

Every month, Mile High Mamas features a Q & A from The Children’s Hospital on a different health topic. This month’s topic is all about choosing the laundry detergent that is best for your child’s skin. Read up on clean clothes and clear skin. Kids come in contact with laundry detergent on a regular basis – like every time your little one touches clothes, bedding or towels. With detergent being a common cause of irritation and rashes, how do you choose the product that’s best for your family? How can I tell if my child is having a reaction to our laundry detergent? Exposure to detergent may trigger a reaction on the skin that can include: * Dry, chapped areas * Rashes * Redness * Scaly, itchy patches It looks like a skin reaction – now what should I do? If your child experiences any o...

The Children’s Hospital Q & A: Soothing Summertime Allergies

Every month, Mile High Mamas features a Q & A from The Children’s Hospital on a different health topic. This month’s topic is all about how to sooth your child’s summer allergy symptoms. Learn how to reduce allergens in your home so springtime allergens don’t ruin your summer. Most people think allergies should stop acting up after springtime. Unfortunately, culprits such as pollen, insects and various plants can extend allergy symptoms into summer. What causes seasonal allergies? Pollen is the primary substance responsible for both spring and summertime allergies. Because most trees finish pollinating by late spring, the majority of summertime pollen is produced by grasses. In the Denver area, grass pollen is the most common summer allergen, affecting seasonal allergy sufferers from A...

The Children’s Hospital Q & A: Growing Pains

Every month, Mile High Mamas features a Q & A from The Children’s Hospital on a different health topic. This month’s topic is all about your child’s growing pains. Find out why that tiny voice in the middle of the night keeps whispering, “Mommy, my legs hurt.” According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, as many as 40% of children in the U.S. ages three to five and eight to 12 have growing pains; that’s because most kids experience significant growth within these ages ranges. How can I tell if my child is experiencing growing pains? The following symptoms are the most common indicators of growing pains: * Pain is concentrated in the leg muscles, particularly the front of the thighs, calves or behind the knees. * The pain is felt in both legs. What causes growing pains? “We don’t kn...

The Children’s Hospital Q & A: Stomach Pain or Appendicitis?

Every month, Mile High Mamas features a Q & A from The Children’s Hospital on a different health topic. This month’s topic is all about knowing the difference between your child’s stomach pain and appendicitis. Learn how to tell distinguish a tummy ache from potential inflammation of the appendix. Appendicitis typically affects children between the ages 11 to 20. If left untreated, the condition can have serious consequences — including the spread of infection due to rupturing — which is why parents should know the difference between stomach pain and something potentially more serious. What is appendicitis? Appendicitis is inflammation of the appendix, a small organ within the digestive tract. Although it is one of childhood’s most distressing medical concerns, with early diagnosis app...

The Children’s Hospital Answers Parents’ Heart Questions

Every month, we’ll be featuring a Q & A from Children’s Hospital on a different health topic, as it relates to you or your children. This month’s topic is all about the heart! How does the heart work? The heart is the strongest muscle in the body, separated into four chambers: right atrium (upper chamber), right ventricle (lower chamber), left atrium, and left ventricle. Unoxygenated (blue) blood enters the right atrium, goes through the right ventricle and to the lungs, via the pulmonary artery. In the lungs, blood picks up oxygen (red), and reenters the heart’s left atrium through the pulmonary veins. From there, it goes through the left ventricle, then to the rest of the body via the aorta, supplying the body with oxygenated (red) blood. This delivers energy to all the cells in the ...

Q&A with The Children’s Hospital

Every month, we’ll be featuring a Q & A from Children’s Hospital on a different health topic, as it relates to you or your children. This month’s topic is Donating Blood! Q & A: Donating Blood to The Children’s Hospital What is unique about The Children’s Hospital’s blood donation needs? Unlike centers that store blood from large donation events for later use, The Children’s Hospital must draw blood every day because our young patients need the freshest blood possible. More than adults, children need fresh blood to maximize successful transfusions. Some children with special needs can only accept blood five to 14 days old. Our doctors who transfuse blood to infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) prefer to use blood that is one to five days old. In 2008...

Parents’ Ten Most Frequently Asked Questions about H1N1 Flu

Experts at The Children’s Hospital Answer Parents’ Ten Most Frequently Asked Questions about H1N1 Flu 1. Does my child have H1N1 flu? The classic symptoms of H1N1 are a fever with a cough and a sore throat. If your child has flu symptoms and H1N1 is widespread in the community, he or she probably has H1N1. Your child doesn’t need any special tests to reach this conclusion. Currently only patients who need hospitalization are tested. If your child has a sore throat with a fever and doesn’t develop a cough, he or she may need to be checked for Strep throat. 2. How can I make my child feel better? The treatment of H1N1 depends on your child’s main symptoms. To open a blocked nose, use a nasal wash with saline. For a cough, use one to two teaspoons of honey (do not use for children under one y...