Motherhood

Letting our bigger kids know they’re not alone

I slept on my teenage daughter’s bedroom floor last night. It wasn’t a slumber party. It was just all I could do. She’d gone to bed early, as she does on nights she has that option, which aren’t many. I’d gone to bed early, too, but was awakened around 10 by my mom radar, which is almost never faulty. Sure enough, light and sobbing were coming from her room. I went in to find her sitting up in bed, an assigned-reading book from one of her classes open on her lap and tears streaming down her face. She was crying because she was upset because she wasn’t sleeping. She wasn’t sleeping because she was so tired she knew she should be sleeping but she was stressed about needing to sleep, which was keeping her awake. Also, her typical teenage body clock...

Mom Blog: On Being a Good (and Bad) Mother

For the past several years, we have run this article on Being a Good (and Bad) Mother on our mommy blog for Mother’s Day. It is a good reminder of why we’re in this together and you are enough. Every year, mothers are celebrated on that one special May day (which is not to be confused with “mayday,” another word with which mamas are familiar). And every year growing up, I remember my mother was consumed with guilt and inadequacy, the very antithesis of what Mother’s Day is supposed to be about. Was she the perfect mom? Of course not. None of us are. But she loved, sacrificed and cared for her children as best she could. A few years ago, I was at a resale children’s clothing store. As I poked around, the shopkeeper asked the age of my son and she confided...

Mom: Advice from a grandma to live now!!

I asked a friend of mine what kind of advice would she give as she enters this next chapter as a grandma?   She sent me the following very interesting answers:   1) After loving my parents, my brothers, my husband, my children, my friends, I have now started to love myself. 2) I just realized I’m not “Atlas”( a book of maps or charts). The world does not rest on my shoulders. 3) I enjoy dealing with fruit and vegetable sellers. After all, a few cents more won’t blow a hole in my pocket, but it might help the poor man save for his kids’ school fees. 4) I pay the taxi driver without waiting for change. The extra cash can bring a smile to your face. After all, he’s working a lot harder than I am. 5) I stopped telling older people who have told thi...

Hey working moms! This one’s for you…

I recently learned about dialectal thinking — the idea that two seemingly opposite things can both be true at the same time. The goal is to shift from saying things like: “I really want to be there for my sick child today BUT I have to be at work for meetings.” To something like: “I absolutely love being there for my children when they need me AND I also really need to be there for these commitments at work.” When you use “but” in your statements and thoughts, it negates the entire first part of the sentence. For instance, in the first statement, using the “but” makes it seem like taking care of business is more important to you than taking care of your child. And we all know that’s not true! I’m beginning to believe that this type of limiting thinking is what causes “mom guilt”. My hope (...

Denver Mother’s Day 2024: The Ultimate Gift Guide, Events & Brunch Ideas!

Mark your calendars for Sunday, May 12, 2024, because Mother’s Day is almost here! From unique gifts from your favorite Colorado artisans to brunch to tea, we have the Ultimate Guide to enjoying Mother’s Day in Denver. Don’t miss our annual gift guide and scroll down for Mother’s Day events and brunch. Tip: We will be updating this list frequently so be sure to check back!   Mother’s Day Gift Ideas for Denver Moms 2024 Wellness Getaways For experiential gifts, there’s nothing better than Colorado’s unique wellness getaways, retreats, programs and clubs. A few of our favorites: Boulder Open Space and Mountain Parks offers Shinrin Yoku, the Japanese art of forest bathing, a research-based framework for supporting healing and wellness through immersion in forests. The...

Instead of asking kids ‘how was your day’ ask this instead!

Anyone else tired of asking the same question “how was your day?” and getting the same standard answers? OK. Fine. Nothing exciting.  Here are a few questions to ask next time you reunite with your kiddos after a long day at school. And remember, some kids need time to decompress so if they need a bit of alone time, first, be sure to give them it! Questions to ask your kids after school What was the best part of your day?  Who were you kind to today? What was the hardest part of your day? What was the trickiest feeling you had today? What are you most proud of? What’s one moment you would do-over? What’s one thing you’re grateful for? Tell me one thing that you learned today. When were you bored today? Tell me something that made you laugh today. Who...

Celebrate isolated moms in Denver with flowers and gifts

Are you looking for a Mother’s Day gift to show your mom or maternal figure that you are thinking of them? By supporting Volunteers of America’s “I Remember Mama Fundraiser,” you can give in honor of a loved one and, in return, we will mail them your special message for Mother’s Day. This fundraiser supports VOA Colorado’s Retired and Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP), which delivers handmade cards, a program with kind messages, goodie bags, and other treats for older women who would otherwise spend Mother’s Day alone. “It is so nice to hear someone ask about my well-being. Receiving the card is the most inspiring thing. I have it on display. This card lifted my spirits. It gave me the energy to go outside and enjoy the nice weather”. – I Remember Ma...

Because I Love You: A Love Letter to My Teen

“Why can’t you just trust me?” my 12-year-old daughter accused. I stopped and stared. It had been a year of upheaval as we moved from a home and peers she loved and was thrust into a new middle school’s enemy territory.  She had transitioned beautifully and made new friends, was on the honor roll for the first time and excelled in volleyball, skiing and climbing.  Then came that call came from the school that she was struggling and she continued to unravel over the coming weeks.  My husband and I got to work. Our laissez–faire attitude has shifted to a more hands-on approach (with many sleepless, anxiety-filled nights) but there I was being accused by the very person I was trying to help. After a long pause, I slowly responded, &#...

The Problem with Perpetuating the Myth

In the morning, in the bathroom, while I am doing Mini Me’s hair is when we have our deepest conversations. Here is our conversation last Sunday before church: Mini Me: I can’t wait for Christmas so I can get more TOYS, TOYS, TOYS! Me: That’s great. (Brushing absent-mindedly) Mini Me: Is Santa Claus real? Me: He is as real as you want him to be. (Ambiguously sly) Mini Me: How real? (Puzzled) Me: As real as the Great Pumpkin. Mini Me: What does he do? Me: He waits for good little boys and girls in the pumpkin patch on Halloween. (Bluffing, because I can’t remember how the cartoon goes.)

Our revolutionary, best-selling parenting book: How Not to Get Eaten Alive

My husband and I are currently in what we refer to as “the good years” of parenting. At ages 8 and 10 our little cherubs are becoming self-sufficient, funny, great travelers and are often downright delightful. Though life certainly isn’t perfect, we’re holding fast to these fleeting  moments because we know the granddaddy of them all will soon be upon us: teenagers.  Sure, we’re seeing hormonal, irrational glimpses of our future but as of yet, they’re nothing compared to the toddler years. I remember shortly after my daughter Hadley turned 3 she went through a phrase I called The Tyrant. When I offered suggestions for a snack, I braced myself for the unleashing of how dare I even suggest something so unthinkable as apples. When I pretended to t...

Finders and Keepers, Losers and Weepers

My children have yet to learn the value of money. They get a dollar every so often for chores or from the Tooth Fairy, but I usually find it a week later, wadded up on the bedroom floor. So, when the true owner of a ten dollar bill came into question, I looked at it as an opportunity to teach my kids a lesson. In the end, we all got a little more than we bargained for. Mini Me, my seven-year-old daughter, ran downstairs excited about something. She handed me a dictionary and said, “Look inside.” What I found was a ten dollar bill. She asked if she could keep it. I told her that it’s probably someone’s birthday money that they stashed and forgot about, but if nobody claimed it, she could have it. I called my ten-year-old twin boys down and showed them the dictionary....

It’s official: I’m a (lice) nit-picker!

I’ll admit it. I don’t like bugs. If there’s one in the house and my kids are around, I’ll take a deep breath, tell them that all of nature counts, and gently put it outside. If they aren’t nearby, I’ll smash it to smithereens with the nearest large object I can find. Either way, it makes my butt pucker. So imagine how I reacted a few years ago when the school nurse called. My kids had lice. Eww. Plus a bleggh. Let me be clear. I am not the kind of parent whose children get lice. I believed that honor was reserved for, you know, those bad parents. At least I believed that until I, too, was initiated into the Nit Picking Club. To make matters worse, apparently the school discovered my kids had lice when one of the little boogers in my daughter’s hair lost its grip and tumbled to its death o...