Health

Surviving my son’s suicide: A Denver mom’s story

Mother of four Peggy Green has known loss. The Denver mom’s daughter passed away at 9 months old. And her son Connor died by suicide in 2018. She has since dedicated herself to sharing her journey of grief in hopes of helping others. Peggy’s first book, Life After Child Loss: The Mother’s Survival Guide to Cope and Find Joy, is an Amazon bestseller. She has written a second book, Survive Your Child’s Suicide: How to Move through Grief to Healing. Please tell us about Connor Connor died by suicide in 2018. His death was a surprise. He was 24 and working a new job, moved into a house with some friends and seemed happy. I found out after his death that he was struggling financially and having difficulty in a relationship. I wondered how I would make it. I made it through Cour...

Breast Cancer Awareness: Do you have dense breasts and why it’s important for detection

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month and we recently watched an interview with Katie Couric on the TODAY show about her breast cancer diagnosis. (Read her essay Why Not Me? on her website about her diagnosis. In her interview, she talked about the importance of undergoing a mammogram and the importance of learning whether or not you have ‘dense breasts.’ The reason? The denser your breasts, the higher your risk of cancer.  And more than half of women over 40 in the U.S. have dense breasts. Dense breast tissue also makes it harder for radiologists to see cancer on mammograms. Dense (fibrous and glandular) breast tissue looks white on a mammogram. Breast masses and cancers can also look white, so the dense tissue can make it harder to see them. In contrast, fatty tissue ...

Grieving a Stillbirth Child: Colorado Bereavement Doula Shares Isolating World of Loss

October 15th is Pregnancy & Infant Loss Awareness Day and a Colorado bereavement doula has co-released a film to help begin this conversation.  be still takes a thoughtful look at stillbirth and how grief manifests itself in the lonely and isolating world of loss. The  12-minute film has been met with critical acclaim, winning awards at many film festivals including at the Horsetooth International Film Festival and Wyoming International Film Festival. The film was recently released to the public in honor of Pregnancy & Infant Loss Awareness Month.  About Be Still be still gives viewers insight into something that is often left undiscussed – child and pregnancy loss. Caroline learns in her third trimester that her baby has died in utero. What follows is a look at...

Picky eater? Use these tips to expose them to different foods!

Do you have a picky eater?   My friend’s son only had two food groups for years: McDonald’s and pizza. His parents were incredibly frustrated and tried so many tips and tactics to get him to branch out…and he eventually did but it took several years and this was after exhaustive testing to ensure he did not have sensory processing disorder or food allergies.    I was recently reading in The Natural Parent Magazine about the importance of “exposure” and how it may look a lot different than what we might think. Did you know that all of these count as EXPOSURE? ⁠ ⁠ How do you deal with picky eaters? Here are some insights: ⁠  Limit snacks and drinks. Most feeding clinics ask parents to record what their child has eaten and drunk for at le...

Anxiety and Children: how to help your children through the school year

Do you have an anxious child? I remember being nervous about important tests or athletic tryouts. It wasn’t until COVID and lockdowns hit that I had even a small inkling of what anxiety and panic attacks can feel like. I have a child who has struggled with depression and the occasional anxiety attack but never something to the level that a friend is experiencing with their middle schooler. This child was anxious in her younger years–I remember she couldn’t leave her mother’s side for any reason. Play therapy helped significantly guide her for a long time. But now, the mixture of middle school and hormones has elevated this anxiety to a whole new level, to the point where she can’t stay overnight anywhere other than her home (even if her family is with her) and...

‘When Mommy is Sad’: A Colorado Mom’s Journey Through Depression

We recently learned about a beautiful children’s book “When Mommy is Sad” written by Heidi Bartle, a Colorado mom who has struggled with depression and bipolar disorder. In the book, she explores her feelings and actions and their impact on her family. She shares her steps toward recovery include self-care, meeting with doctors, taking medication, and working with a therapist. The story’s resolution is not one of healing, but of hope. Tell us about yourself and your family. My husband, Garry, and I have been married for 24 years. We have five children: two young adults, one high schooler, and two middle schoolers. They are all wonderful humans. I have a bachelor’s degree in Health Science but stayed home with my kids in lieu of working in the field until the l...

Denver parents open cutting-edge mental health clinic in honor of daughter

John and Karla Tartz have never worked in a mental health clinic, let alone opened their own, but they have business talking about the brain. “We started to research things and get busy about a year ago,” said John, sitting beside his wife in the lobby of Rose NeuroSpa in Lone Tree. “We’re finding there were so many cutting-edge treatments out there,” said Karla. “We had no idea.” The couple plans to open their mental health clinic on Aug. 8 where they’ll offer traditional and alternative care to patients such as TMS (transcranial magnetic stimulation) which has been proven to treat major depressive disorder. About ‘Rose’ The couple described the clinic as a spa to take care of your brain. It’s affectionately named for their daughter. “Rose i...

Hate the heat? This hilarious Denver mom shares your pain!

Reflecting on my growing up years, I not so fondly remember how my mother would keep the house at a frigid 65-ish degrees. In the dead of winter. There is nothing like waking up in the morning and having to check your extremities for frostbite. One night when I was staying there with my newborn daughter, I woke up in the middle of the night and was so cold, I actually started a fire in the fireplace and slept with my baby in front of it, feeling like one of those survivalists who cleverly escaped misfortune. There should be a reality series for people who have to survive their own mother’s menopausal catastrophe. I complained to her about it constantly.  Now, I owe my mom  – may she rest in peace – one big apology. I have been in a relationship for several years, and ...

Denver teen battles eating disorder but finds lack of resources in Colorado

When the COVID-19 pandemic pushed schools to around the country to cancel in-person classes, Emma Warford was 15 years old, an active athlete, a good student and functioning well. However, as days turned to weeks and weeks to months, Warford said she began worrying about her weight while sitting at home in quarantine. The then-sophomore started counting calories, admitting she became obsessed with her food intake. Even after school returned to in-class learning, Warford said she continued to latch onto her calorie-counting habit, calling it her “coping mechanism” for stress. In 2021, Warford, who lives in both Highlands Ranch and Centennial, said she went to see her regular-care physician who took notice of her weight loss. “My doctor noticed that I had completely fallen off my growth char...

A Sordid Tale of When One Loses More Than Just One’s Mind

When my son Bode was little (33-pounds to be exact) I loved going for bike rides with him in his bike trailer. It was one of those delightful early summer days and we started strong. Translation: we went downhill. My house is perched atop a hill that takes me about two minutes to ascend on my bike, 20 minutes when pulling Bode and about 2 hours with my then-40-pound daughter Hadley added to the mix. There was a good reason I chose to do the ride when she was still in preschool. Bode and I have a regular route through a nearby Open Space park. We often pass “Swiper” the Fox by a footbridge, “Daffy” Duck paddling in the pond and if we’re lucky, we’ll spot “Wile E.” Coyote perched under his favorite shade tree. Our animal nomenclature is commerc...

Mother’s Day and Infertility: A Denver Mom Shares Her IVF Journey

It seems we all know someone who has struggled with infertility, and maybe that someone is you.  I’m one of those 1 in 8 who struggled to get pregnant. I wanted to take a minute and share a bit of our story and hope that it may help contribute to the dialogue that once was considered taboo.   My husband and I were on the “older” side when we got married.  I was in my later 30’s and my husband was early-mid 40’s.  We were eager to start a family. About a year into our marriage we decided to pursue testing to help us figure out what may be hindering our ability to get pregnant.  We approached it as a team and learned we had some male factor issues in addition to polyps in my uterus that were recommended be surgically removed. We were told IVF was really the bes...

Strep throat and how to save mankind one spit glass at a time

This pandemic world just feels heavy so here is a Facebook memory to lighten your day!  A few years ago, I got strep. Now, I’ve had strep many times but nothing like that latest bout, which I deemed STREPZILLA. I was rendered unable to speak or eat due to the agonizing pain. On the plus side, I dropped five pounds. I went to Urgent Care where they loaded me up with antibiotics and sub-par painkillers. My husband Jamie helped out a lot over the weekend but I knew he would be back to work as usual on Monday (my son’s day off). The little dude was a great sport coping with his deadbeat mother but I asked my friend Eva to watch him so he could have some social interaction with people who don’t use perturbing charades to communicate. The toughest part about the illness wa...