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10 tips for hiking with babies in Denver

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I started hiking with my kids when they were six weeks old with a mom hiking group in Denver. Not only was it an amazing way to connect with other moms, but my kids developed a love of the outdoors from an early age. I was able to continue carrying them until they were almost 30 pounds because they were comfortable in the backpack.

Our best advice? Teach them while they’re young! If you’re looking for inspiration about where to hike in Denver, scroll to the bottom.

10 tips for hiking with babies in Denver

1. Check the age and weight recommendation of your pack or front carrier before taking your baby on a hike. Our pack had a 6-month, 15-pound minimum, and, although we put our daughter in earlier, we stuck to trails that were smooth to avoid jarring her head and neck. Before you start hiking, check to make sure the pack is properly adjusted. See our buying guide to backpack to 

2. Bring a blanket or neck pillow so your baby can comfortably rest their head to sleep in the pack. For some reason, I have yet to see a pack that comes with a nice head support- especially for younger babies.

3. Remember to bring a clean diaper and some wipes–even on short hikes!

4. Wear hiking shoes with good traction and ankle support. You don’t want to fall with your baby on your back. Even a bit of moisture can make the granite we hike on very slick. Good traction on your shoes will help! I struggled to find good hiking boots for years and ultimately found Merrell women hiking boots worked well for me. Tip: If you buy them from REI, you may pay a bit extra but their return policy is excellent in case your boots aren’t a good fit; I’ve even returned boots after a couple of months worth of wear.  

5. Carry kid-safe bug spray like All Terrain Kids Herbal Armuor Deet-free Insect Repellent. This spray even kept the mosquitoes off my daughter in Denali, Alaska!

6. Apply and reapply sunscreen! The Colorado altitude can lead to nasty sunburns.

7. Always take a poncho and a jacket for yourself and your baby. Colorado weather can change in an instant.

8. Watch for objects along the trail above your head and to your side that could hit your baby through the pack. Also, make sure that you are not rubbing little legs and arms into bushes with stickers, trees with needles, or poison ivy as you walk along the trail.

9. Watch for signs of heat exhaustion in the summer and hypothermia in the winter. Offer your baby water when you have a drink.

10. ALWAYS hike with another adult. Remember that if something happens to you, your baby won’t be able to go for help!

And most of all, remember to have fun, relax, and enjoy the scenery!

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Mile High Mamas
Author: Mile High Mamas

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