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Keeping Kids Safe: Childproofing (and mom-proofing) your laundry room

Keeping Kids Safe: Childproofing (and mom-proofing) your laundry room
This post is in partnership with Tide. Join Mile High Mamas as we spread the important message to keep pacs up, keep pacs closed, and keep children safe.

Once upon a time when I was an exhausted mother of my firstborn daughter, I attempted to do the laundry. In my sleep-deprived state, I reached up to grab the bleach and inadvertently knocked it off the shelf. The problem: I had not secured the lid and a steady stream of household chemicals unleashed directly into my eyes.

tidepodThankfully, I’d put my daughter down so she was not in the line of contact. Blinded, I called my mother-in-law in a panic to rush me to urgent care where they successfully flushed out my eyes. I learned first-hand about the importance of childproofing (and mom-proofing) the laundry room and all areas in the home.

Studies show that though parents often take precautions to properly childproof their home–such as locking away cleaning products in their kitchens–the laundry area is often overlooked.  Tide’s new safety campaign further educates parents by being aware and properly closing and storing laundry pac containers.

Currently being used in 20% of households, liquid laundry pacs have quickly become a part of many Americans’ daily routines because of their concentrated cleaning power. Households with children, infants to age five, are at greater risk of incident as they love to explore and may come in contact with various household items, good and bad.

At first glance, how many safety hazards can you find in this childproofing video?


Here are a few childproofing tips from the American Academy of Pediatrics

  1. Store household cleaning and laundry products in locked cabinets or on high shelves out of reach of children.
  2. Never let your young children touch laundry pacs. The pods dissolve quickly when in contact with water, wet hands, or moisture.
  3. Kids love to squirt spray bottles. Secure them just as you would any other chemical.
  4. Keep irons and iron cords out of reach of children.
  5. Install safety latches that lock when you close the door on child-accessible cabinets.
  6. Keep detergent and cleaning products in their original packaging. Place stickers on all poisonous substances (even those in locked cabinets) and teach kids what they mean.

Stay tuned for more information from this new advertising campaign dedicated to keeping children safe and making parents aware.

Amber Johnson
Author: Amber Johnson

Amber is the founder and editor of Mile High Mamas, travel writer and former columnist for The Denver Post. She is a passionate community builder and loves the outdoors. She has two awesome teens and is happily married to a man obsessed with growing The Great Pumpkin.

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Amber is the founder and editor of Mile High Mamas, travel writer and former columnist for The Denver Post. She is a passionate community builder and loves the outdoors. She has two awesome teens and is happily married to a man obsessed with growing The Great Pumpkin.

2 Comments

  1. You’re so lucky you didn’t get more hurt with the bleach. Good message. I think we spend a lot of time focusing on the rest of the house for baby proofing but we figure we’ll just keep the laundry room door closed. Doesn’t always work out that way.

  2. Those pacs look like candy! We haven’t had an experience with the laundry pacs but my son tried to eat one for the dishwasher.

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